WHAT YOU'LL NEED

Equipment

- Sauté pan
- Rubber spatula

Ingredients

- Olive oil
- Flank steak
- Butter
- Brussel sprouts
- Salt
- Pepper
- Coffee beans


THE STEPS

1. Add oil or butter to a sauté pan on high heat. Swirl the pan so the fat coats the bottom evenly. 00:24

2. Once the oil is hot, add the chopped flank steak or other protein. Stir with a rubber spatula, loosening any pieces that stick to the bottom. 00:59

3. With one fluid motion, tilt the pan handle-side up so the meat cubes are pooled toward the bottom. Then quickly move the pan up and back and down in a small circular motion. The meat should be tossed briefly in the air then land back in the pan. Season with salt and pepper as the meat browns. Repeat the motion as needed. 01:21

4. To sauté vegetables, melt butter in a pan on high heat. 02:10

5. Once the butter is melted, add the vegetables to the pan and swirl so they absorb the butter. Add salt and pepper to season, if needed. 02:37

6. The motion is the same as sautéing the meat. Tilt the pan handle-side up so the vegetables pool toward the bottom. Then quickly tilt the pan up and back and down in a small circular motion. The vegetables should be tossed briefly in the air and land back in the pan. Repeat as needed. 03:04

7. Vegetables are done sautéing when they have a char and are starting to wilt on the outside yet are tender and still vibrant in color. 03:41

8. To practice the motion of sautéing, put coffee beans, rice, or a similar small-particle ingredient in a sauté pan. No heat is needed. 03:58

9. Slide the pan back and fourth on a flat surface to practice controlling the ingredients as a cohesive mass. 04:25

10. To practice the toss, tip the pan forward so the beans pool towards the bottom and then quickly flip the pan up and back and down. The beans will be tossed briefly in the air then land back in the pan. Practice and repeat as needed. 04:33

CHEF NOTES

To sauté means to cook evenly by making the food "jump" [from French] in the pan. It is a quick cooking technique where the food is constantly moving.

A sauté pan has a broad flat surface with higher sides to help move food around and up.

Sautéing requires the use of a fat, like oil or butter, to lubricate the pan and transfer heat to the food.