Castor sugar may not be easy to track down, but it is easy to make. In fact, it's really nothing more than granulated sugar that has been ground to a super-fine consistency. Here's how to make your own castor sugar in seconds. Castor sugar may not be easy to track down, but it is easy to make. In fact, it's really nothing more than granulated sugar that has been ground to a super-fine consistency. Here's how to make your own castor sugar in seconds.

1. Place granulated sugar in a food processor or blender.
2. Pulse until it reaches a super-fine, but not powdery consistency.
3. Allow the sugar to settle for a few minutes. Then, use it in place of the castor sugar called for in your recipe.
Tips:
1. Sugar may etch your blender pitcher, particularly if it's made of plastic. If this is a concern, use a coffee grinder or spice grinder instead.
2. You can also make your own powdered sugar, muscavado sugar, brown sugar and colored sugar at home.

Difference between Granulated Sugar and Castor Sugar
Sucrose, table sugar, is mainly extracted from either sugarcane or sugar beet.

Sugar is processed through a long process. First the juice is extracted, and then purified with lime and heat. Then it is further processed, and it eventually separates into sugar crystals and molasses. The sugar crystals are bleached and refined to give the end product, which we buy at the supermarket. This is the traditional white sugar.

Some of the forms of sugar available are granulated white sugar or table sugar, superfine (castor or caster) sugar, coarse (decorators or pearl) sugar, crystal sugar, confectioners, powdered or icing sugar, invert sugar, brown sugar, raw sugar, Demerara sugar, Muscovada or Barbados sugar, Turbinado sugar, etc.

Each one has its specific uses especially for cooking and baking. The type of sugar used is extremely important, especially in baking. This is true, as the size of the sugar crystal affects the amount of air that can be incorporated into the baking batter, especially during the creaming of the sugar and fat or butter. The size of the crystal will also affect how quickly the sugar will dissolve in the batter. All these factor effect the look, consistency and taste of the finished baking product.

The most commonly used sugar is the granulated sugar. This is the sugar that we use on a daily basis, as well as in most recipes. Granulated sugar is well recognized due to its paper-white color and fine crystals. They are able to dissolve better when added to recipes or heated. When heated, granulated sugar tends to take on a toffee-like color and flavor, which is why it is also often used in the production of caramel.

Granulated white sugar, also known as table sugar, has medium-sized granules, about 0.5 mm across. The medium size of the granules allows the sugar to incorporate more air into the batter, as oppose to most other types of sugar. However, the size of the sugar crystals may vary from difference manufactures. Some may be too fine, while some may be too large. Mixing granulated sugar with sugar syrup and molding them in lumps leads to the production of sugar cubes.

Castor sugar is also known as caster sugar, superfine sugar, ultrafine sugar or bar sugar. It is a type of granulated sugar that has superfine granulated crystals, usually 0.35 mm. The term castor or caster sugar is mainly used in UK English and its Commonwealth countries. In North America, it is sold as super fine sugar. In Canada, specifically in British Columbia, it is termed as berry sugar. The term ‘castor’ refers to a form of sieve called castor, as the grains of the sugar are fine enough to fit through the said sieve.

The super fine size of the sugar crystals allow the sugar to dissolve almost instantly. It is often used to sweeten cold beverages, such as iced tea, lemonade and other drinks, which is why it is also often termed as bar sugar.

In baking, it is commonly used to make meringue and frosting. Some cake or cookie recipes do call for castor sugar, however, most use granulated sugar, as granulated sugar allows more air to be incorporated in to the batter, which results in a softer and fluffier cake. In order to substitute for castor sugar, one can simply run the granulated sugar through a food processor for a couple of minutes until the granules have reduced in size.


How To Make Powdered Sugar (Confectioner's Sugar)

If you have granulated sugar on hand, you can make your own powdered sugar in under two minutes.

1. in the blender for each cup of powdered sugar needed.
2. Blend at high speed until the sugar turns to powder.
3. Use immediately, or store in an air-tight container.

Tips:
1. To prevent caking and improve thickening ability (important when making icing), add 1-2 Tablespoons of corn starch for each cup of sugar made.
2. Sugar may etch your blender bowl, particularly if it's made of plastic. If this is a concern, use a coffee grinder or spice grinder instead.

How To Make Brown Sugar

Brown sugar couldn't be easier to make if you have granulated sugar and molasses in your pantry. You may discover you never need to buy brown sugar, you can use this simple recipe and save cupboard space.


How to Make Light Brown Sugar from White Sugar and Molasses

1. Measure one cup of granulated sugar and one tablespoon of molasses into a mixing bowl.
2. Stir with a fork until completely mixed. Your brown sugar is now ready for use!


How to Make Dark Brown Sugar from White Sugar

1. Measure one cup of granulated sugar and two tablespoons of molasses into a mixing bowl.
2. Stir with a fork until it is completely mixed, then use it as dark brown sugar.
How to Make Dark Brown Sugar from Light Brown Sugar
1. Measure one cup of light brown sugar and one tablespoon of molasses into a mixing bowl.
2. Stir with a fork until it is completely mixed, then use it as dark brown sugar.

This simple recipe works because molasses is a byproduct of making white sugar. It contains sugar and some protein, minerals and vitamins. It doesn't go to waste. Molasses is added back into white sugar to make brown sugar. Light brown sugar contains about 3.5 percent molasses and dark brown sugar contains about 6.5 percent molasses. By adding molasses to white sugar you are doing exactly what happens at the sugar factory.

Brown Sugar Alternatives If Don't Have Molasses

• Try adding a tablespoon of maple syrup in a cup of granulated sugar. Like molasses, it will give a different flavor element. Real maple syrup works best, but maple-flavored syrup could be used in a pinch.
• Agave nectar can also be used, mixing a tablespoon in with a cup of granulated sugar.
• Buckwheat honey has a strong flavor much like molasses and you may use it as well, mixing a tablespoon into a cup of white granulated sugar.

• Rum flavoring may also add a flavor similar to molasses to a dish. Just use white sugar in your recipe and add a couple of drops to the mixture. Rum is made by fermenting and distilling sugarcane juice or molasses. It's not wise to use actual rum as it won't have enough of the concentrated flavor and will add more liquid and alcohol to the recipe, requiring other adjustments.

How To Make Colored Sugar

Making your own colored sugar is easier than you think. It's also likely that you already have everything you need right there in your kitchen.
• Granulated sugar, sanding sugar or raw sugar
• Food coloring (liquid is often preferred over gel)
• Plastic sandwich bag or waxed paper


How to Make Colored Sugar

Homemade sugars can be any color you like.
1. Place sugar in a plastic zipper bag or on a piece of waxed paper.
2. Add a drop of food coloring and mix until the color is evenly distributed throughout the sugar.
o The plastic bag works perfectly because you can knead the sugar without a lot of mess.
3. Continue to add food coloring one drop at a time until you are satisfied with the color.
o Five drops of food coloring will typically create pale colors. Add more to intensify the color.
4. Break up any lumps in the sugar.
5. Either use your colored sugar immediately or allow it to dry.
o To dry the sugar, spread it out in a thin, even layer on wax paper or a baking sheet. It should be dry in about 15-20 minutes.
6. Store in an air-tight container. It'll keep for a really long time in the pantry, so make a bunch.


Tips for Homemade Colored Sugar

• If your sugar comes out darker than you'd like, simply add more sugar to the mix.
• Liquid food coloring is easier to mix into the sugar. It's less sticky, so it doesn't clump like gel food coloring. However, some bakers prefer the brighter colors possible with gel food coloring. Experiment and see which you prefer.
• The colored sugar may be a little lumpy. After it dries, run it through a sifter or sieve to return it to its original texture.
• You can also use this technique to color coconut.
• Flavor you sugar by adding a drop or two of extract while coloring it.
• When sprinkling sugar on top of frosted cookies or cakes, do it when the icing is nice and fresh. The sugar will stick better and make less of a mess.


Tips for Homemade Colored Sugar

• If your sugar comes out darker than you'd like, simply add more sugar to the mix.
• Liquid food coloring is easier to mix into the sugar. It's less sticky, so it doesn't clump like gel food coloring. However, some bakers prefer the brighter colors possible with gel food coloring. Experiment and see which you prefer.
• The colored sugar may be a little lumpy. After it dries, run it through a sifter or sieve to return it to its original texture.
• You can also use this technique to color coconut.
• Flavor you sugar by adding a drop or two of extract while coloring it.
• When sprinkling sugar on top of frosted cookies or cakes, do it when the icing is nice and fresh. The sugar will stick better and make less of a mess.