Allergy/Allergies

An allergy refers to an exaggerated reaction by our immune system in response to bodily contact with certain foreign substances. It is exaggerated because these foreign substances are usually seen by the body as harmless and no response occurs in non- allergic people.

Allergic people’s bodies recognize the foreign substance and one part of the immune system is turned on. Allergy-producing substances are called “allergens.” Examples of allergens include pollens, dust mite, molds, danders, and foods. To understand the language of allergy it is important to remember that allergens are substances that are foreign to the body and can cause an allergic reaction in certain people.

When an allergen comes in contact with the body, it causes the immune system to develop an allergic reaction in persons who are allergic to it. When you inappropriately react to allergens that are normally harmless to other people, you are having an allergic reaction and can be referred to as allergic or atopic. Therefore, people who are prone to allergies are said to be allergic or “atopic.”

The word allergy is derived from the Greek words “allos,” meaning different or changed and “ergos,” meaning work or action. Allergy roughly refers to an “altered reaction.” The word allergy was first used in 1905 to describe the adverse reactions of children who were given repeated shots of horse serum to fight infection. The following year, the term allergy was proposed to explain this unexpected “changed reactivity.”

Hi, can anyone suggest a substitute for mushrooms? I know somebody who loves them but has developed a mild allergic reaction to them.

The only thing that comes to mind for me is firm tofu. The texture would be close and tofu picks up flavors from whatever it is cooked with. If there are other alternatives I am sure KW will let you know.