Convection oven

KW: Can you tell me the formula for converting recipes to use in a convection oven? My oven is a dual oven, but I rarely use the convection because when I have tried it I seem to overcook foods. I have tried to compensate, but it is hit and miss.

It’s a hard call - not knowing the exact wattage, the different types of models, etc. and I don’t want to steer you wrong.

Here’s a for instance - when baking chicken wings in my gas oven versus my convection oven I save 20 to 30 minutes, depending on the batch size, wing size.

Cooking a roast, whole chicken, chicken halves, turkey breast - the time was cut down by 25% at least.

(you already know I don’t make pies, cakes, etc. in it - it just doesn’t turn out the way I like)

When making a roast in the convection oven, I turn it frequently, usually keep it covered until the last 15 to 20 minutes, and I baste during the cooking time.

Because of the differences in ovens I would start keeping a close eye on your roasts half way through the cooking process. If you would normally have a roast in the oven for 2 hours, start watching closely after 1 hour.

I don’t think this is much help - but I do hope you find that “happy medium” with the convection oven. They are really nice to have and they cut down on the cooking time for so many things - depending on dish - 25 - 50%.

Thanks for your answer. I guess I will just have to risk it.

Just a thought - do you have the book that came with the stove when you bought it??

Also - what is the brand name of the oven? You may be able to get further info on line by contacting the manufacturer.

I found this - will it help at all???

CONVECTION OVEN RECIPE CONVERSION GUIDELINES

Cooking is not an exact science, due to many variables such as size and
quantity of food, temperature of food when first put in the oven, etc.
Convection cooking takes place due to the forced flow of hot air, thus saving energy
by cooking approximately 25-30% more quickly than conventional ovens.

Foods lose less moisture and retain nutrients.

The internal temperature in the convection oven is easily regulated since the
fan keeps the hot air constantly circulating so the food cooks uniformly.

The following are general guidelines for converting conventional recipes
for use in a convection oven. *

Option one: Bake at the same temperature that the
conventional recipe recommends, but for less time.

Option two: Bake for the amount of time that the conventional recipe calls for,
but reduce the temperature of the oven by about 25 degrees F.

Option three: (Best) Bake for a little less time than the conventional recipe
calls for, and also reduce the temperature of the oven.

TIPS:

  1. ALWAYS PREHEAT OVEN BEFORE PUTTING FOOD IN OVEN!!!
    (unless your recipe directs otherwise)

  2. If your original conventional recipe baking time is less than 15 minutes,
    keep the original baking time but reduce the temperature by 25-30 degrees F.

  3. As with any recipe, check the food about 5-10 minutes before the expected
    finish time, due to variables such as the temperature of the food when first placed
    in the oven, quantity of food in the oven, your preferred level of “doneness”, etc.

  4. The more food in the oven at one time, the longer the cooking time.

  5. Some folks recommend preheating any oven at 50 degrees F above the desired temperature, then turning the temperature control down to the desired temperature
    once you put the food in and close the door. This is because an oven can lose one degree per second that the door is open. The average loss is about 50 seconds.

  6. The choice of when to use a convection oven and when to use a conventional
    oven with radiant heat often depends on the cooking container rather than the food.
    The whole point of convection cooking is to have
    the fan circulating the heat around the food.
    Casserole lids and high-sided cooking pans block the heat from circulating
    around the food and prevent the oven from cooking efficiently.

A few rules of thumb for best results:

Cookie sheets – use convection oven

Shallow pans (inch sides or so) – use convection oven

Anything covered (including roasting bags) – use conventional oven

Deep roasting pans – use conventional oven

  • For the mathematically inclined:
    Use either of 2 versions of the “25-30” Rule.
    Either option is OK, and neither is better than the other
    (exception: recipes with conventional baking times of less than 15 minutes,
    see first Tip above.) For example, if a recipe calls for you to bake a cake
    at 350 degrees F for 30 minutes in a conventional oven:,

Option one: Bake at the same temperature that the conventional recipe recommends, but for about 25-30% less time. So the cake will bake at 350 degrees for about 21-23 minutes. (100% - 30% = 70%; 30 minutes x .70 = 21 minutes;
100% - 25% = 75%; 30 minutes x .75 = 22.5 minutes.)
Option two: Bake for the amount of time that the conventional recipe calls for, but reduce the temperature of the oven by 25-30 degrees F.
So in the cake example, bake at 320-325 degrees (350 – 30 = 320 degrees;
350 – 25 = 325 degrees) for 30 minutes.

1 Like

and I found this -

Convection ovens use fans to move hot air around, which helps speed cooking times. Generally, food prepared in a convection oven cooks 25 percent faster than it would in a conventional oven. The rapid moving of hot air also browns foods more evenly, locks in juices on roasts, and eliminates the hot spots found in conventional ovens.

To convert conventional oven recipes for a convection oven - heat the convection oven to 25oF lower than the recipe calls for. Also, expect food to be done in 25 percent less time than it would be in a conventional oven. Start checking for doneness about 10 minutes before the food is scheduled to be done, and even sooner for foods that cook for extended periods, such as roasts.

To choose the pans - no special pans are required for convection cooking, but baking sheets and roasting pans with low sides will allow food to cook more quickly and brown more evenly.

To roast meats by convection - place the meat directly on the oven rack and position a drip pan on the lowest rack. The forced hot air will seal the outside surface of the meat to help lock in juices. Thus, the meat will drip less and brown more evenly, so you won’t need to turn it or baste it as you would in a conventional oven.

Cooking baked foods by convection - a convection oven will dry out the surface of food, creating a thicker crust on baked foods. As a general rule, use convection for breads, pies or other foods where a thicker crust is desirable. When no crust is desirable, as in cakes and rich desserts that have a high moisture and fat content, it’s best to stick with conventional oven cooking. Pastries and meringues cooked by convection could set at a tilt due to circulating air currents.

DUH!!! I never gave it a thought to look in the book. “When all else fails, read the directions.” Thanks again.

LMAO! Oh how I needed to smile today!
And I’m the blonde here!

Why is it - that some people just never ask for directions??? No wonder it took the Egyptians 40 years to get out of the desert!

You’ve made my day - don’t be upset with me - but it is a well-deserved smile for me!

You can smile further. I got out my directions and guess what!!! They are all in THAI. Now I have to find someone who can translate for me; not an easy task.

YIKES! Ok - back to the drawing board - how about contacting the manufacturer on line and reading it in English??? It’s very possible that they will have an on-line version in English.

LOL, I have tried that, but my model is not on their website. When I tried to send them an e mail the address that is on my booklet is not correct. My next step next week will be to call them and hope i can talk to someone who speaks English. Oh! the fun of living in a foreign country.

Geez - but you ain’t licked yet!

I’ve come up with this:

Classic Roast Turkey

Notes: If using a frozen turkey, start thawing it in a pan in the refrigerator 3 to 4 days before roasting, depending on its size. If turkey overlaps pan rim, tuck a strip of heavy-duty foil along pan sides during roasting to keep fat from dripping over.

Yield
Allow 3/4 pound uncooked turkey per serving, at least 1 pound if you want leftovers

1 turkey (10 to 30 lb.; see notes)
Melted butter or olive oil
Classic Gravy

  1. Remove and discard leg truss from turkey. Pull off and discard any lumps of fat. Remove giblets and neck (they’re often packed in neck or body cavity) and save for classic gravy. Rinse turkey inside and out; pat dry. Rub turkey all over with butter.

  2. Place turkey, breast up, on a V-shaped rack in a 12- by 17-inch roasting pan (or one that is at least 2 in. longer and wider than the bird). Insert a meat thermometer straight down through thickest part of breast to the bone. (If using an instant-read thermometer, insert when checking temperature.)

  3. Roast in a regular or convection oven until thermometer registers 160°. (See below for times and temperatures.)

  4. If turkey is unstuffed, tip slightly to drain juices from body cavity into pan. Transfer turkey to a platter. Let stand in a warm place, uncovered, for 20 to 30 minutes, then carve. If thigh joints are still pink (common in an oven-roasted bird), cut drumsticks from thighs, place thighs in a baking pan, and bake in a 450° oven until no longer pink, 10 to 15 minutes, or put on a microwave-safe plate and cook in a microwave oven at full power (100%) for 1 to 3 minutes. Serve with Classic Gravy.

Oven-roasted turkey: temperatures and times:

For a 10-13 lb. turkey (weight with giblets): Bake in a 350° oven for 1 1/2-2 1/4 hr.

For a 14-23 lb. turkey (weight with giblets): Bake in a 325° oven for 2-3 hr.

For a 24-27 lb. turkey (weight with giblets): Bake in a 325° oven for 3-3 3/4 hr.

For a 28-30 lb turkey (weight with giblets): Bake in a 325° oven for 3 1/2-4 1/2 hr.



General guidelines
Manufacturer Guidelines
Follow the recommendations from the manufacturer of the oven. Your oven typically shipped with a user guide.  It is a good idea to familiarized yourself with the specifics for your own oven.  If you don't have a user manual then try contacting the manufacture to obtain a copy.  Many provide printable copies online.

Air Circulation
Air circulation is important. Don't cover racks with foil. Allow 1 to 1 1/2 inches around pans (also above and below pans for multi-rack baking).

Use Proper Pans
For maximum browning, use pans with low sides, and rimless cookie sheets. Many ovens come with special pans and racks that lift roasts so air flows all around. If possible, place the long sides of the pan parallel to the oven door.

Roast meats and poultry
Preheating is not necessary. Place meats on a rack in the roasting pan for better browning. Roasting time may be 20 to 30 percent less than in a conventional oven if temperatures aren't reduced. Some ovens offer a special roasting mode that provides top and/or bottom browning or an initial surge in heat in addition to the fan. These modes make it easy to get optimum results in a shorter time.

Small Roasts or Unstuffed Poultry
Do not reduce oven temperatures for small pieces, skinny roasts, or unstuffed poultry. In our tests, we roasted a 3 1/2-pound chicken at 375 |degrees~. In about an hour, about 20 percent less time than for conventional cooking, it was beautifully browned, with succulent flesh.

Dense Roasts & Stuffed Turkeys
For large, dense roasts and big stuffed turkeys, you may need to reduce the temperature 25 |degrees~ during part or all of the roasting time. When you lower the temperature, the meat may be juicier and shrink less, but it will take longer to cook.

CHEWY CHOCOLATE CHUNK COOKIES

1 cup. shortening
1 cup. brown sugar
1/2 cup. white sugar
2 large eggs
1 tsp. vanilla
1 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
3 cup. cake flour
1 bag nestle chocolate chunks

PREHEAT OVEN T0 350 DEGREES.
1- Combine shortening, brown sugar, white sugar, and vailla. Cream at high speed for 2 minutes. * Use Speed 6 for 1 1/2 Minutes on Kitchenaid stand mixers*

2- Add both eggs and beat for 2 minutes. * Speed 6, 1 1/2 Minutes on Kitchenaid stand mixers*

3- Add baking soda, Salt , and Cake flour. Stir slowly to avoid flour bomb. Making sure after you stir, you scrape sides of bowl. Then beat for 2 minutes. * Speed 6, 1 1/2 minutes on kitchenaid stand mixers.*

Fold in Chocolate Chunks.

Place cookies by teaspoon onto a cookie sheet lined with SILPAT. Wax paper and Parchment might work the same way. Bake for about 5 minutes then remove, let stand for 5 minutes, then place onto wire rack. Let cool and place in bowl, adding a piece of broken up bread to keep soft.

*PLEASE NOTE

This recipe was made using a Kitchenaid Stand mixer, professional bakeware, and a Professional Kitchenaid Convection oven. Individual recipes made with a different oven, and mixer WILL no doubt come out differently! Kitchenaid mixers take less time, mix acurately and convection ovens cook quicker and more thoroughly.



Follow the specific instructions given by your oven manufacturer, keeping these general guidelines in mind.



When converting recipes from conventional to convection, use the temperature and time from the original recipe as a guideline, checking for doneness after three-quarters of the baking time has elapsed. Or, the original baking temperature may be reduced by 25 degrees F in general. Open the oven door as little as possible during baking. 
Because convection ovens offer superior results when browning and crisping foods, most recipes designed for convection ovens do not call for baking dishes to be covered. If you do use your convection oven to bake a standard recipe that calls for the dish to be covered, the temperature and time will likely be about the same. For covered long-baking recipes designed for a standard oven, you may reduce the temperature by 25 degrees F to 50 degrees F when using a convection oven. 
Follow the user's manual for manufacturer's recommendations for preheating a convection oven. Be sure to position oven racks before you turn the oven on because they will heat up quickly. 
To enable hot air to circulate around the food, place foods in the center of the oven; be sure to leave space between pans and oven walls. 
Always test food a few minutes before the minimum cooking time has elapsed, using the doneness test given in the recipe. Keep in mind that even when food appears golden brown, it may not be completely done.

Honey Glazed Pork
This can also be used in your regular oven in is very tasty. Cook time has been omitted since that will depend on what cut of meat you are using.
3 lbs. meat (change servings and units)

2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon cornstarch
3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
3 lbs pork (chops, loin, etc.)

Microwave the glaze ingredients in a micro-safe container until cornstarch is dissolved. Brush on meat and grill as directed by your convection oven handbook.
(okay - so the instructions aren’t the greatest…)



Baked Ham W/ Pineapple for the Convection Oven
Recipe #167304 | 35 min | 10 min prep | add private note 
| Edit... 
My Notes: 

My Notes 
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Glazed ham for the convection Oven
 
     
 
3 lbs canned ham 
1 (8 ounce) can crushed pineapple, undrained 
1 tablespoon cornstarch 
1/2 cup brown sugar 
1 tablespoon lemon juice 
2 teaspoons dry mustard 



Score ham. Microwave 20 minutes. Drain any liquid. 

Blend glaze ingredients in a microwave-safe dish. Microwave 4 minutes or until mixture thickens and looks clear. Spoon over the ham, keeping the pineapple on top. 

Cook ham on broil/brown about 5 minutes, basting twice. Let stand covered for 10 minutes. 

convection broiling:
Broiling fresh vegetables, fish, shrimp, chicken, steak or chops is one of
the fastest ways to prepare a fabulous healthy meal and broiling in a Bosch,
Gaggenau or Thermador Convection oven is a new experience in oven broiling.
These ovens are equipped with catalytic converters that absorb all the
grease and particulates so no longer will your house fill with smoke and
your smoke alarms produce a piercing symphony when you broil in your oven.
In addition these ovens feature extra large broilers that enable you to
evenly broil large quantities at one time.
Convection Broil Tips: Vegetables, fruit, fish, prawns and chicken can be
broiled on a lightly greased baking tray, do no use aluminum foil to line
the pan. Chops, steaks, burgers and sausages should be broiled on a
traditional covered broiling pan so that the fat is shielded from the direct
heat of the broiler. Convection Broil provides strong powerful heat that
will sear the food and cook evenly, use Broil only for lighter broiling or
browning.
convection roasting:
For menus featuring roast meats together with side dishes and desserts refer
to the Convection Multi-Level menus: If your oven is not equipped with a
meat probe, using a digital instant read thermometer will ensure that your
meat is cooked to perfection. When roasting in a Gaggenau oven use the
Convection mode.When roasting in a Thermador or Bosch oven use the
Convection Roast mode.
convecton baking:
Convection is the ideal cooking mode for multi-level baking of cookies,
cakes and pastries or appetizers. In the Convection Bake mode, additional
heat is provided from the lower element in conjunction with the Convection
element, this is ideal when baking heavy dense casseroles or breads pies and
quiches that benefit from the additional bottom heat to ensure that the
dough is cooked through.
This ability to direct the heat according to the type of food you are
cooking can also be used to bring baked items to a perfect finish. For
example if your quiche or pie is nicely browned yet the interior is not set,
simply change the mode to ‘bake’ or bottom heat only, once the Convection is
turned off the heat from the bottom element will gently ‘finish’ the baking
process without overcooking your goodies.
convection steaming:
The steam oven that combines Convection with pressureless steam brings a
whole new dimension to oven cooking. Steam seals in flavor and nutrients
making it the perfect mode for healthy low fat cooking. The Combi oven can
be used in the steam mode for steaming vegetables, chicken, fish, dumplings,
tamales or grains or for refreshing food. It can also be used in the
Convection mode together with the steam for roasting and baking and it can
also be used in the Convection only mode.
The remarkable thing about cooking with Convection and steam is that the
skin of poultry becomes crispy while the meat is tender and moist. Steam
combined with Convection is a dream come true for the baking enthusiast as
the oven can be used as a proof box then heated quickly to the correct
baking temperature and injected with a burst of steam to aid the development
of the dough and produce a wonderful crisp crust. Use the Operating modes on
page 11 of the oven manual as a guide to help you understand how to use this
remarkable oven.
convection multi level cooking:
The ability to cook several diverse dishes evenly at one time is one of the
greatest benefits of Convection. Whether you are preparing a simple family
meal or a more elaborate feast you will find this one of the most rewarding
ways in which to prepare a meal. With a little advance preparation
multi-level cooking allows you to cook with ease and simplicity always make
sure your racks are in the correct position to accommodate the baking dishes
before you begin heating the oven.

convection broiling:
Broiling fresh vegetables, fish, shrimp, chicken, steak or chops is one of
the fastest ways to prepare a fabulous healthy meal and broiling in a Bosch,
Gaggenau or Thermador Convection oven is a new experience in oven broiling.
These ovens are equipped with catalytic converters that absorb all the
grease and particulates so no longer will your house fill with smoke and
your smoke alarms produce a piercing symphony when you broil in your oven.
In addition these ovens feature extra large broilers that enable you to
evenly broil large quantities at one time.
Convection Broil Tips: Vegetables, fruit, fish, prawns and chicken can be
broiled on a lightly greased baking tray, do no use aluminum foil to line
the pan. Chops, steaks, burgers and sausages should be broiled on a
traditional covered broiling pan so that the fat is shielded from the direct
heat of the broiler. Convection Broil provides strong powerful heat that
will sear the food and cook evenly, use Broil only for lighter broiling or
browning.
convection roasting:
For menus featuring roast meats together with side dishes and desserts refer
to the Convection Multi-Level menus: If your oven is not equipped with a
meat probe, using a digital instant read thermometer will ensure that your
meat is cooked to perfection. When roasting in a Gaggenau oven use the
Convection mode.When roasting in a Thermador or Bosch oven use the
Convection Roast mode.
convecton baking:
Convection is the ideal cooking mode for multi-level baking of cookies,
cakes and pastries or appetizers. In the Convection Bake mode, additional
heat is provided from the lower element in conjunction with the Convection
element, this is ideal when baking heavy dense casseroles or breads pies and
quiches that benefit from the additional bottom heat to ensure that the
dough is cooked through.
This ability to direct the heat according to the type of food you are
cooking can also be used to bring baked items to a perfect finish. For
example if your quiche or pie is nicely browned yet the interior is not set,
simply change the mode to ‘bake’ or bottom heat only, once the Convection is
turned off the heat from the bottom element will gently ‘finish’ the baking
process without overcooking your goodies.
convection steaming:
The steam oven that combines Convection with pressureless steam brings a
whole new dimension to oven cooking. Steam seals in flavor and nutrients
making it the perfect mode for healthy low fat cooking. The Combi oven can
be used in the steam mode for steaming vegetables, chicken, fish, dumplings,
tamales or grains or for refreshing food. It can also be used in the
Convection mode together with the steam for roasting and baking and it can
also be used in the Convection only mode.
The remarkable thing about cooking with Convection and steam is that the
skin of poultry becomes crispy while the meat is tender and moist. Steam
combined with Convection is a dream come true for the baking enthusiast as
the oven can be used as a proof box then heated quickly to the correct
baking temperature and injected with a burst of steam to aid the development
of the dough and produce a wonderful crisp crust. Use the Operating modes on
page 11 of the oven manual as a guide to help you understand how to use this
remarkable oven.
convection multi level cooking:
The ability to cook several diverse dishes evenly at one time is one of the
greatest benefits of Convection. Whether you are preparing a simple family
meal or a more elaborate feast you will find this one of the most rewarding
ways in which to prepare a meal. With a little advance preparation
multi-level cooking allows you to cook with ease and simplicity always make
sure your racks are in the correct position to accommodate the baking dishes
before you begin heating the oven.

Cinnamon Rolls

2 c. flour
1 tbsp. baking powder
1 tsp. salt
1/4 c. shortening
3/4 c. milk
Melted butter
Sugar
Cinnamon
Raisins and chopped nuts (optional)

Blend flour, baking powder and salt in a medium bowl. Cut in shortening with a pastry blender until mixture looks like coarse meal. Add milk and stir with fork until blended. Transfer dough to a floured surface. Knead 10 times. Roll dough 1/2 inch thick. Roll dough into a rectangle approximately 8 x 12 inches. (It will be about 1/4 inch thick.) Brush with melted butter or margarine, sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon. (Raisins and-or chopped nuts may be added.) Starting at a long end, roll the dough tightly. Using thread, cut the dough into 1/2 inch slices and place in a well greased pan. Bake in a preheated oven at 425 degrees (convection 375 degrees) 15 minutes until golden brown. Yield: 15 rolls.

Apricot Oat Bread

2 1/2 c. Quaker Oats (quick or old fashioned), uncooked
1 tbsp. plus 3/4 tsp. baking soda
1 1/4 tsp. salt
2/3 c. margarine or butter
2 1/2 c. boiling water

Combine ingredients. 2 c. brown sugar, packed Beat eggs and sugar on medium speed for 2 minutes. 2/3 c. whole wheat flour Add flours; mix on low speed until blended. Add oatmeal mixture; mix until blended. 1 tbsp. orange peel, grated 1 c. pecans, chopped Add remaining ingredients; mix on low speed until blended. Scale 2 pound 8 ounce batter into each greased 9 x 5 x 2 3/4 inch loaf pan. Bake: Convection oven - 300 degrees for 40 to 45 minutes; Conventional oven - 350 degrees for 55 to 60 minutes. Cool before slicing.

Asparagus Casserole

Cooking time: 10 minutes. 15 oz. can asparagus pieces 3/4 lb. shredded cheddar cheese, divided 4 hard cooked eggs, chopped, divided 1/2 c. milk 10 3/4 oz. can cream of mushroom soup, undiluted Place wire rack in lower position of oven and preheat to 350 degrees. Sprinkle half of cracker crumbs into 1 1/2 quart microproof and heatproof casserole. Drain asparagus, reserving 3 tablespoons liquid. Arrange half of cheese, asparagus, and eggs over crumbs. Repeat layering. Combine milk, mushroom soup, and reserved liquid in small bowl and blend well. Pour over top. Cook (microwave/convection) at 350 degrees, 10 minutes. Makes 6 to 8 servings. Broccoli, spinach, or zucchini can be substituted for asparagus.

Ground Beef Casserole

1 sm. onion
1/2 c. sliced celery
3 tbsp. chopped pepper
1/4 c. butter or margarine
1 tsp. salt
Dash of pepper
1 lb. ground beef
1 1/2 c. raw noodles
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1 can cream of chicken soup
1/2 c. milk
1/4 c. mayonnaise
3/4 c. grated cheese

Brown onion, celery and pepper in butter or margarine. Add meat, salt and pepper. Stir until browned. In bowl blend soups, milk, mayonnaise and noodles. Add to meat mixture. Place in casserole. Sprinkle with cheese and bake 30 to 35 minutes in micro convection at 350 degrees or 1 hour at 350 degree regular oven.

Sesame Oven-Fried Chicken

1 egg
1/2 c. milk
1/2 c. all purpose flour
2 tbsp. sesame seeds
2 tsp. baking powder
2 tsp. paprika
1 tsp. garlic powder
1 tsp. salt
2 1/2 - 3 1/2 lb. broiler-fryer
chicken, cut up
1/2 c. margarine or butter, melted

Beat egg and milk in medium bowl. In a plastic or paper bag combine flour, sesame seeds, baking powder, paprika, garlic powder and salt. Dip chicken pieces in egg mixture, then shake in bag to coat. Arrange chicken pieces skin side up on turntable. Pour margarine evenly over chicken. Bake 35 minutes on High Mix (325 degrees in convection/microwave type oven or 50 minutes on 325 degrees in conventional oven). Makes 4 to 5 servings.

Chicken Dijon

?? pounds chicken pieces
2 c. dijon mustard
2 c. honey

Blend honey and mustard. Marinate chicken in honey mustard mixture overnight.

Savory Oat Crunch Topping:
1 qt. plus 1 c. Quaker Oats (quick or old fashioned), uncooked
2 1/2 c. pecans, finely chopped
1 1/4 c. onions, finely chopped
1 1/4 c. margarine or butter

Saute oats, pecans, and onions in margarine approximately 2 minutes; cool. Drain chicken. Roll and pat chicken in Savory Oat Crunch Topping. Place coated chicken on well greased 18 x 26 inch sheet pan. Bake: Convection oven, 300 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes; conventional oven, 350 degrees for 35 to 40 minutes.

Broiled Lamb Chops with Curried Yams and Swiss Chard

4 loin or shoulder lamb chops
3 peeled cubed yams
1 bunch finely sliced Swiss chard
1 finely sliced onion
1 tablespoon safflower oil
1 teaspoon cumin
½ teaspoon garlic powder
¼ teaspoon salt
dash of cayenne pepper
1/3 cup mayonnaise
1 tablespoon curry powder
optional ½ cup currants

Begin by steaming or boiling the yams for 12-15 minutes until fork tender
but not mushy. Drain and cool. Saute the onion in a little hot oil for 5-6
minutes until it becomes translucent add the chard and stir-fry over medium
high heat for several minutes. Lower the heat, cover the pan and continue
cooking for 6-8 minutes until the chard is tender. Cool the chard and
combine gently with the yams, mix in the mayonnaise and curry powder and
currants if using.
Preheat the oven to Convection Broil 500. Combine the cumin, garlic powder,
salt and cayenne and rub evenly into the lamb chops. Place the chops on a
covered broil pan and broil 4 minutes each side for medium rare.
Serves 4 people

Southwestern Chicken Salad with Broiled Chicken Breasts

1 package hearts of Romaine
2 ripe avocadoes, peeled and sliced
4 ripe medium chopped tomatoes
1 medium red onion finely chopped
1 bunch cilantro washed and chopped
1 finely chopped jalapeno pepper
1 can corn kernels
1 can black beans
4 boneless half chicken breasts
juice of two limes
corn oil
1 tablespoon Fajita seasoning

Preheat the oven to Convection Broil 400 degrees. On a sheet of wax paper or
plastic wrap pound the thick end of the chicken breasts to flatten. Rub the
Fajita seasoning into the chicken breasts and pour ½ of the limejuice over
the chicken, set aside to marinate while you mix the vegetables. In a large
bowl combine the corn, black beans, red onion and jalapeno. Add the
remainder of the limejuice and a little corn oil and season with salt and
pepper, fold in the cilantro and the tomatoes.
Coarsely chop the Romaine lettuce and place on a large platter. Pour the
vegetables over the lettuce and arrange the avocado slices over the
vegetables. Broil the chicken breasts for 5-6 minutes on each side until the
juices run clear. Cool for a few minutes then slice on the diagonal with a
thick knife and arrange over the salad. Garnish with a little chopped
cilantro.
Serves 4-6 people

Thinly sliced rib eye steaks served on baguette slices and topped with olive
tapenade makes a wonderful tapas or appetizer, to prevent flare-ups season
the meat with salt after broiling.

Broiled Rib Eye Steak with Tapenade

2 rib eye steaks
½ teaspoon minced garlic
½ teaspoon dried thyme
½ teaspoon paprika
1 baguette cut in thin slices
1 jar olive tapenade

Preheat the broiler to 500 degrees Convection Broil. Season the steaks with
the garlic thyme and paprika. Place the steaks on a covered broil pan and
broil 4 minutes on each side for rare and a few minutes longer for medium.
Season the meat with salt and pepper and rest for a few moments before
cutting in thin slices. Place the meat onto the bread slices and top with a
dollop of tapenade.

Roast Chicken

1 7lb roasting chicken or two 4lb chickens
¼ cup unsalted butter or 2 tablespoons olive oil
¼ cup Herbs de Provence
2-3 cloves minced garlic
1 teaspoon paprika
salt & pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 450 Convection and combine butter or oil with seasoning.
Remove giblets and excess fat, rinse the insides and pat dry with a paper
towel. Rub the seasoning mixture into the skin and the inside of the
chicken. Tie the legs togetherand tuck the wings under to hold the shape of
the bird. Place the chicken onto the rack in a shallow roasting pan and pour
about a cup of liquid into the bottom of the pan. You can use a smaller
roasting pan and rack but remember for best results do not roast in a
deep-sided pan. Roast at 425 Convection for 20 minutes; insert the meat
probe into the meatiest part of the breast and program the probe to reach
180 degrees. Reduce the temperature to 375 and continue roasting until the
probe chimes to alert you that the correct temperature has been reached.

Roast Boneless Leg of Lamb

1 6-8lb boneless leg of lamb
4 cloves minced garlic
2 teaspoons crushed dried rosemary
1/3-cup olive oil
2-3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees Convection. Combine the herbs and seasoning
with the oil and vinegar; make a few shallow slashes on each side of the
meat and rub into the meat. Place on a rack in a shallow roasting tray and
cook for 20 minutes. Insert the meat probe and program to 150 for medium
rare and 160 medium or 170 for well done. Tent with foil and rest for 10-15
minutes before carving.

Roast Rack of Lamb

2 7-rib lamb racks
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried or fresh chopped rosemary
3-4 cloves minced garlic
salt & pepper to taste
2 tablespoons olive oil

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees Convection. Combine the herbs and seasoning
with the olive oil to make a paste. Rub the mixture over the lamb and place
on a rack in a shallow baking pan. Place in the oven and insert the meat
probe in the thickest part of the meat. Reduce the temperature to 400 and
program the probe to 135 for medium rare or 145 for medium.

Cuban Style Marinated Roast Pork Shoulder

1 3-4lb butterflied boneless shoulder of pork
2 teaspoons cumin
1 teaspoon dried oregano
4 cloves minced garlic
2 tablespoons corn oil
zest of 2 limes finely shredded
1/3-cup limejuice
½ cup thawed concentrated orange juice
salt& pepper to taste

Lay the meat out flat and pierce all over with a sharp knife or fork, place
the meat in a large glass-baking dish. Combine the ingredients for the
marinade and pour over the meat. Refrigerate for 4 hours or overnight.
Preheat the oven to Convection 375 degrees. Roll the roast and tie with
string, place on a rack in a shallow roasting pan and pour over half of the
marinade. Place in the oven and reduce the temperature to 325 degrees.
Insert the meat probe and program to 165; the cooking time will be
approximately 2 hours. Halfway through the cooking time pour the remainder
of the marinade over the meat. Let the roast stand for 10-15 minutes prior
to slicing.

Marinated Pork Tenderloin

Pork loin and tenderloin roasts are so lean they are always best marinated
or brined prior to roasting. Many markets offer these roasts already
marinated however it is fairly simple to create your favorite marinade using
a bottled sauce or even some sparkling apple cider.

1 2-3lbs boneless pork loin
½ cup dry vermouth
1 cup sparkling apple cider
4 granny smith apples, peeled, cored & quartered
1 cup pitted prunes
1 teaspoon dried thyme
2 medium onions cut into 8 wedges
salt & pepper to taste

Place the pork in a glass-baking dish with the cider and vermouth and soak
for four hours or overnight. Pre-heat the oven to 400 Convection. Gently
combine the apples, prunes onion and seasoning.
Place the meat on a shallow baking tray and surround with the apple mixture
and half of the soaking liquid. Place the meat in the oven and reduce the
temperature to 350 degrees, insert the meat probe and program to 150.

Roast Prime Rib

Prime rib is a simple yet spectacular star for a dinner party or special
occasion feast. Creating a crust for the meat with a simple spice rub mixed
with some garlic and oil is all that is needed, allow 2 ribs per person when
ordering and order a boneless roast for easier carving.

1 5lb boneless prime rib roast
¼ cup mixed Italian seasoning and minced garlic
2-3 tablespoons olive oil
salt & pepper to taste

Make a few shallow slits in the meat and rub in the oil and seasoning
mixture over the meat. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees, place the meat on a
rack in a shallow roasting pan, place in the oven and lower the oven
temperature to 400. Insert the meat probe and program to 135 for medium
rare, 145 for medium and 160 for well done. Set the timer for 20 minutes
then reduce the temperature to 350 for the remaining cooking time. Be sure
to let the meat rest tented loosely with foil for at least 15 minutes prior
to carving.

Roast Fillet of Beef

1 3 to 4lb beef fillet

Again the best way to treat this meat is simply, rub the meat with an herb &
garlic spice rub as suggested for the beef rib roast. Pre-heat the oven to
450 degrees, Convection. Place the meat on a rack in a shallow roasting pan
and set in the oven. Reduce the temperature to 400 degrees and program the
meat probe for 130 medium rare, 140 medium or 160 for well done. Set the
timer for 20 minutes and reduce the temperature to 350 for the remainder of
the cooking time. Rest before carving.

Roast Salmon

1 5-6lb side of salmon
½ cup mayonnaise
3 tablespoons of hot sweet mustard
1 teaspoon dill
salt & pepper to taste

Pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees. Combine the mayonnaise, mustard, dill and

seasonings. Wipe the salmon with some damp paper towels and spread the
mixture evenly over the salmon. Place on a lightly oiled large shallow
baking tray. Roast for 20 minutes then check the thickest part of the fish
for doneness.

Savory Swiss Chard Tart

A slice of a savory vegetable tart is a wonderful meal served together with
soup or salad and even makes a great leftover breakfast treat. The pastry
recipe for this tart is one of the easiest I have ever worked with and can
be used with a variety of fillings.

2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
½ teaspoon salt
½ cup water
½ cup extra virgin olive oil
1 lb swiss chard leaves
4 large eggs
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan or Gruyere cheese
salt & pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Convection Bake. Cut away the coarse white
stems of the chard and wash the leaves. Shake off the excess water and slice
the leaves into thin strips. Place the chard into a large shallow sauté pan
and season with salt and pepper. Wilt over low heat until most of the liquid
has evaporated, set aside to cool.
Combine the flour and salt in a medium-size bowl. Stir in the water, then
the oil mixing until thoroughly blended. Knead briefly the dough should be
moist and quite pliable. Press the dough into a 10"metal tart tin with a
removable bottom.
Combine the eggs and cheese in a bowl and whisk gently to blend. Stir in the
chard then pour into the prepared tart pan. Bake at 375 degrees Convection
Bake for 30-35 minutes until the crust is golden and the filling is firm.
Cool before serving.

Garlic Tomato Tart

This is another wonderful filling for the easy to make olive oil pastry
crust.

2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
½ teaspoon salt
½ cup water
½ cup extra virgin olive oil
½ cup sun dried tomato pesto
6-8 medium peeled chopped tomatoes
8 cloves chopped garlic
4 large eggs lightly beaten
½ cup freshly grated Parmesan or Gruyere cheese
olive oil
½ teaspoon dried basil

Preheat the oven to Convection Bake 400 degrees. Gently sauté the garlic in
some olive oil over medium heat, add the tomatoes and basil with just a
little juice and cook for 10 - 15 minutes to soften. Stir in the tomato
pesto and set aside to cool. The filling should not be too wet so skim off
any excess juice.
Combine the flour and salt in a medium bowl. Stir in the water, then the oil
mixing until thoroughly blended. Knead briefly then press the dough into a
10" pie pan with a removable bottom. Combine the eggs and cheese in a
medium-size bowl and mix till well blended, season with salt and pepper to
taste.
Place the pie pan onto a cookie sheet, this will stop any of the egg filling
from dripping onto the oven floor and will make it easer to handle moving
the tart in and out of the oven. Spread the tomato mixture over the pastry
crust and pour the egg and cheese mixture over the tomato mixture. Place the
tart into the oven and bake at 375 degrees Convection Bake for 35 minutes.

Potato Sausage Frittata

4-5 small Yukon Gold potatoes thinly sliced and cut in quarters
3 tablespoons butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium chopped onion
½ teaspoon dried oregano
2 smoked chicken sausages thinly sliced
8 large eggs
½ cup freshly grated cheddar cheese

Preheat the oven to Convection Bake 400 degrees. In a large {12-14"} shallow
ovenproof skillet sauté the onions and potatoes in the butter and oil
together with the dried oregano. Cook over medium heat until the potatoes
begin to brown and are cooked through. Add the sausage and stir well to
combine. Beat the eggs and pour over the vegetable mixture, sprinkle with
the cheese and bake for at 375 degrees Convection Bake for 20 minutes or
until the frittata is firm. Cool slightly before serving.

Baked Stuffed Pasta Shells

Dishes like this one do involve a little preparation however the delicious
results are always worthwhile. Using a prepared sauce is one way of cutting
down on the preparation time but you can always make your own special sauce
instead.

2 packages manicotti or large shell pasta
1 package ground turkey
1 12oz container alfredo sauce
1 28oz can tomato sauce
1 large chopped onion
2-3 cloves chopped garlic
1 package washed baby spinach
olive oil
½ teaspoon dried oregano

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Convection Bake. Cook the pasta in a large
pot of swiftly boiling water as directed, drain and cool. Sauté the onion
and garlic in a little olive oil together with the oregano for 7-8 minutes
until the onion is translucent, add the turkey and brown over medium high
heat, stir in the spinach and season to taste.
Mix the tomato sauce together with the alfredo sauce and pour half of the
sauce into the turkey mixture, stir well. Stuff the pasta and place in a
large glass-baking dish. Pour the remaining sauce over the stuffed pasta and
sprinkle with a little freshly grated parmesan cheese. Bake at 350 degrees
Convection Bake for 30 minutes.

Banana Chocolate Chip Bread

1 ½ cups unbleached all purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt
½ cup double chocolate chips
¼ cup pecans or walnuts toasted and chopped
1 stick softened unsalted butter
¾ cup sugar
2 large eggs
1 cup mashed ripe bananas
1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Convection Bake. Butter and flour a 9x5x2 ½<br>inch loaf pan. In a large mixing bowl combine the flour, baking soda and
powder and salt. Combine the chocolate chips and walnuts with 1 teaspoon of
flour and set aside. Beat the butter together with the sugar until light and
fluffy about 7 minutes. Add the eggs one at a time , then stir in the
bananas and vanilla. Beat in the flour mixture and fold in the chocolate and
nuts. Bake 325 degrees Convection Bake for 50 minutes or until a knife
inserted comes out clean.

Roast Stuffed Turkey Breast

1 boneless whole turkey breast
1 cups small croutons
2 pippin apples, peeled, cored and diced
1 medium onion coarsely chopped
zest and juice of one lemon
1lb sliced mushrooms
½ teaspoon dried thyme
salt and pepper to taste
½ cup chopped parsley
safflower oil

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees 100% moisture.
In a large skillet over medium heat sauté the onion and thyme in the heated
oil, add the mushrooms and cook for 5-6 minutes until softened. Combine with
the apples, croutons, lemon zest and juice and the chopped parsley and
season to taste. Lay the turkey breast flat skin side down and pound the
meat with a meat mallet (or rolling pin) to flatten. Spread the stuffing
evenly over the meat and roll the sides into the center. Tie the roll firmly
with string and place in an oiled non-perforated baking tray. Place the tray
in the oven and insert the meat probe into the thickest part of the meat,
make sure the tip stays in the meat so you will get an accurate temperature
reading. Program the meat probe to 160 degrees and lower the temperature to
350 degrees. Let the meat rest for 10-15 minutes prior to slicing.
Serves 8-10 people

Citrus Basted Chicken

1 whole broiler-fryer, 3-3-1/2 lbs.
2 large oranges
2 medium lemons
1 small lime
2 Tbs. honey
1 tsp. cornstarch, stirred with 1 Tbs. cold water

  1. Rinse chicken in cold running water. Drain, pat dry inside and out with
    paper towel. Slice one orange, one lemon and the lime in half. Cut half of
    one orange, one lemon and the lime into slices. Squeeze juice from remaining

halves, combine and reserve. Place fruit slices inside chicken.
2. Spray inside of Sunbeam® Rotisserie basket with nonstick cooking spray;
place chicken on the spit and screw spit into the basket. Center chicken on
spit with wings downward, legs upward. Place basket with chicken inside the
rotisserie.
3. Brush 1/3 of citrus-juice mixture over chicken. Reserve remaining
mixture. Close rotisserie door. Plug in Rotisserie and be certain it rotates
freely. Cook about 1 hour, until juices run clear and thermometer inserted
in breast registers 185°F.<br>4. While chicken is cooking, in a small saucepan, combine remaining citrus
juices and the honey. Cook and stir over medium heat. Stir cornstarch
mixture, then stir into saucepan. Cook 2 minutes, stirring constantly until
mixture is thickened and clear; keep warm.
5. When chicken is ready, open rotisserie door, and using oven mitts, grasp
end of spit and basket to remove. Place on a heatproof work surface. Remove
chicken from spit to warm platter to serve.
Makes 4 servings.

Apricot Glazed Cornish Hens for 2

2 Rock Cornish game hens, 3-1/2 - 4 lbs. total weight, thawed if frozen
1/2 cup apricot preserves
1 Tbs. shredded fresh gingerroot
2 Tbs. vinegar
1 Tbs. reduced-sodium soy sauce

  1. Rinse thawed hens in cold running water. Drain and pat dry inside and out
    with paper towels. In a small bowl, combine preserves, ginger, vinegar and
    soy sauce.
  2. Spray inside of Sunbeam® Rotisserie basket with nonstick cooking spray;
    fit onto hub of drip tray. On spit, center one hen with wings downward;
    center second hen on spit with wings upward. Close rotisserie door. Plug in
    Rotisserie, and be certain it rotates freely. Cook, about 1 hour, until
    juices run clear and thermometer inserted in breast reaches 185°F. During
    last 10 minutes of cooking, baste hens with half of the apricot mixture
  3. When hens are ready, open rotisserie door, and using oven mitts, grasp
    end of spit and basket to remove. Place on a heatproof work surface. Remove
    hens from spit to warm platter to serve.
    Makes 2 servings.

Thanks for your help and these recipes will get me started to use the convection oven.

You’re welcomed! At least it is something to go on - each oven is a bit different. I hope this works for you.

Lay the turkey breast flat skin side down and pound the
meat with a meat mallet (or rolling pin) to flatten. Spread the stuffing
evenly over the meat and roll the sides into the center???