Soy Yogurt

Soy yogurt is made by adding a starter culture into the heated soymilk made using the SoyQuick Soymilk Maker. The soy milk coagulates and thickens by an increase in acidity from the lactic acid produced by the bacteria. Making soy yogurt at home puts you in control of the ingredients, tartness and flavor.

Make Soy Yogurt

  1. 6 cups of fresh organic soy milk made using the SoyQuick Soymilk Maker
  2. 1 sachet of Yogurt L+ vital-Ferment culture
  3. 1 tablespoon Pomona’s Universal Pectin powder(This is available in most health food stores, many supermarkets, and you can order it online)
  4. PLUS 1 Tbs. of calcium water (the calcium powder and instructions for making this are in the pamona’s package) (This is to set the pectin-- this type of pectin sets with calcium rather than sugar, as is the case with ordinary fruit pectin.) NOTE: IF YOU ARE USING CALCIUM-FORTIFIED SOYMILK, you don’t need to use the calcium water.
  5. IF YOU ARE USING THE YOGURT ONLY TO MAKE YOGURT SHAKES AND SMOOTHIES, OR FOR MAKING SOY YOGURT CHEESE, ELIMINATE THE PECTIN.

(STABILIZERS FOR SOY YOGURT:Why do we need one? Because of a different type of protein than dairy milk, soy yogurt just does not set as firmly as dairy yogurt.)

TO MAKE FRUIT-FLAVORED YOGURT, I simply add my favorite low-sugar jam to the yogurt just before eating.

EQUIPMENT:
Sterilize all containers, lids and everything that comes into contact with the soymilk and yogurt by scalding with boiling water. This protects the yogurt from stray bacteria.

Have ready your yogurt-incubating paraphernalia. You will need an inexpensive glass candy thermometer, which you can buy wherever kitchen utensils are sold. (You can also use a dairy thermometer, but they are more expensive.)

When you use soymilk to make yogurt, you need to add some type of sugar and some salt because the starter needs some sugar to feed on, and soy does not contain the natural sodium that dairy does. As soon as you strain your soymilk, add your sweetener and salt (Bryanna uses 1 ½ Tbsp organic sugar or maple syrup and 3/8 tsp of salt), and add the kosher gelatin at the same time while the milk is still very hot. Whisk it until dissolved.

Add half of the soymilk (3 cups) to a scalded stainless steel pot, or a Pyrex bowl or measuring vessel that can go in the microwave, with plenty of headroom so that it won’t boil over. Beat in the Pomona’s powder with a hand immersion blender (OR, you can mix the milk and Pomona’s in a blender and then pour into your cooking vessel). Heat to boiling and simmer 1 minute, or microwave for 1 minute. Now add the remaining soymilk. If your milk is cold, the lower temperature will bring down the temperature of the heated milk-- if you’re lucky, to the right temperature! If it doesn’t, cool it in the refrigerator to about 115 degrees F. Use an inexpensive candy thermometer to determine the temperature.

Once the temperature is about 115 degrees F, whisk in the calcium water (DO NOT ADD THIS IF THE SOYMILK IS CALCIUM-FORTIFIED) and 1 sachet Yogurt L+ Vital-Ferment. Whisk well (or use a scalded hand immersion blender) to distribute the soy yogurt throughout (if you do not mix it well, you may have a grainy yogurt). Pour the inoculated soymilk into your scalded jars or container, cover and incubate for 10-12 hours (see below for four ways to incubate). Soy yogurt tends to be mild, so it needs longer to develop the characteristic tartness that we are used to.

During fermentation, avoid disturbing the equipment. If a yogurt maker without an electrical branch connection is used, regular temperature control will be necessary.

After fermentation, set the yogurt in the refrigerator for 12 hours to ripen and allow the full development of the yogurt flavor.

Yogurt Mild can be stored in the refrigerator for approximately 1 week; the lactic acid produced by the lactic acid bacteria has a preserving effect.

NOTE: IF THE YOGURT SEEMS TO HAVE SEPARATED AFTER INCUBATING, WHISK IT UNTIL CREAMY BEFORE PLACING IN THE REFRIGERATOR-- IT WILL SET UP JUST FINE AFTER THOROUGH CHILLING. Use a tiny little whisk in the small jars.

To start the next batch, keep back 1/4 cup of your homemade yogurt. Let it come to room temperature before using as a starter. You can do this about 12-14 times before it weakens and you need to use dried starter again.

FOUR WAYS TO INCUBATE YOUR YOGURT:

  1. You can use 3 pint jars with screw-on lids (the plastic kind, preferably) and place them inside an inexpensive Styrofoam cooler along with 2 quart jars of boiling water (with lids-- and the jar should not touch the yogurt jars). (Warm up the cooler with the jars of hot water while you get the yogurt ready.) Cover the cooler and cover with an old blanket. You may have to add more hot water to the jars halfway through the incubation time.
  2. Use a non-electric yogurt incubator, the type which has a 2-quart plastic container or 1 quart glass jar nestled in a Styrofoam liner inside of a canister.
  3. Use the directions that go with your electric yogurt incubator. Plug the yogurt maker in to warm it up while you get the yogurt ready.
  4. Use a thermos: Almost fill a thermos bottle (preferably wide mouthed) heated for 10 minutes with hot water inside. Pour out the water and add your inoculated soymilk at the right temperature. Put the lid on and wrap the thermos in two or three terry towels, or a small quilt. Set it in a warm, draft-free place overnight.

Ferment the first batch in a yogurt maker at 42 C for 10-12 hours. The longer the yogurt ferments, the more lactic acid is produced and the more intensive the taste will then be. During fermentation, avoid disturbing the equipment. If a yogurt maker without an electrical branch connection is used, regular temperature control will be necessary.

After fermentation, set the yogurt in the refrigerator for 12 hours to ripen and allow the full development of the yogurt flavor.

Yogurt Mild can be stored in the refrigerator for approximately 1 week; the lactic acid produced by the lactic acid bacteria has a preserving effect.

Making Soy Yogurt Without the Addition of Sugar: Inoculation of 1 litre milk, fermentation approx 10 h

Making Soy Yogurt With the Addition of Sugar: Inoculation of 1 litre milk, fermentation approx 5 hours

SOY YOGURT (NO KOSHER JEL NEEDED!)
Servings: 12
Yield: 6 cups or 1 1/2 quarts

This recipe and method makes consistently creamy, white, non-beany-tasting, tart, thick soy yogurt, without all kinds of additives. Because it already has a stabilizer in it, it is great for frozen non-dairy yogurt!

INGREDIENTS:

1.)

6 cups soymilk (NOT vanilla-flavored, unless you really like that flavor in yogurt–I don’t!), commercial OR homemade (see Cooking Tip #1 below for notes on using homemade soymilk-- this is important even if you already know how to make soymilk for drinking!)
NOTE: If using commercial soymilk, use it from a newly-opened sterile tetra-pack carton so that it is sterile and use a variety without calcium enrichment (why?). FOR EXTRA-CREAMY SOY YOGURT USING HOMEMADE SOYMILK, use 3 1/2 to 4 cups of homemade soymilk and 2 cups of a rich, creamy soymilk, such as Vitasoy Original (without calcium enrichment). It’s still pretty cheap made this way.

2.)
1 sachet of Yogurt L+ vital-Ferment culture (dairy-free)
OR
1/4 cup plain, unflavored soy yogurt with live culture in it (homemade OR see below for brands (and kosher brands) of unflavored commercial soy yogurt with live culture), at room temperature

3.)
1 Tbs. Pomona’s Universal Pectin powder (this is available in most health food stores, many supermarkets, and you can order it online at their website (email them if you don’t live in the USA, to see if there are any distributors where you live); or, in Canada, from Harvest Plus)
PLUS
4.)
1 Tbs. of calcium water (the calcium powder and instructions for making this are in the Pomona’s package)
(This is to set the pectin-- low-methoxyl pectin sets with calcium rather than sugar, as is the case with ordinary fruit pectin.) IMPORTANT: DON’T USE CALCIUM-FORTIFIED SOYMILK, OR YOU WILL HAVE A HARD, RUBBERY YOGURT! The calcium water will actually add calcium fortification to your yogurt, so you don’t need to use the fortified soymilk. Too much calcium will make the Pomona’s set too firmly.)

IF YOU ARE USING THE YOGURT ONLY TO MAKE YOGURT SHAKES AND SMOOTHIES, OR FOR MAKING SOY YOGURT CHEESE, ELIMINATE THE PECTIN

See Note on stabilizers in text above.

NOTE: TO MAKE FRUIT-FLAVORED YOGURT, simply add your favorite low-sugar jam to the yogurt just before eating.

EQUIPMENT:

Sterilize all containers, lids and everything that comes into contact with the soymilk and yogurt by scalding with boiling water. This protects the yogurt from stray bacteria.

Have ready your yogurt-incubating paraphernalia. You will need an inexpensive glass candy thermometer, which you can buy wherever kitchen utensils are sold. (You can also use a dairy thermometer, but they are more expensive.)

FOUR WAYS TO INCUBATE YOUR YOGURT:

#1.) You can use 3 pint jars with screw-on lids (the plastic kind, preferably) and place them inside an inexpensive Styrofoam cooler along with 2 quart jars of boiling water (with lids-- and the jar should not touch the yogurt jars). (Warm up the cooler with the jars of hot water while you get the yogurt ready.) Cover the cooler and cover with an old blanket. You may have to add more hot water to the jars halfway through the incubation time.

#2.) Use a non-electric yogurt incubator, the type which has a 2-quart plastic container or 1 quart glass jar nestled in a Styrofoam liner inside of a canister.

#3.) Use the directions that go with your electric yogurt incubator. Plug the yogurt maker in to warm it up while you get the yogurt ready.

#4) Use a thermos: Almost fill a thermos bottle (preferably widemouthed) heated for 10 minutes with hot water inside. Pour out the water and add your inoculated soymilk at the right temperature. Put the lid on and wrap the thermos in two or three terrycloth towels, or a small quilt. Set it in a warm, draft-free place overnight.

MAKING THE YOGURT:

Add half of the soymilk (3 cups) to a scalded stainless steel pot, or a Pyrex bowl or measuring vessel that can go in the microwave, with plenty of headroom so that it won’t boil over . Beat in the Pomona’s powder with a hand immersion blender (OR, you can mix the milk and Pomona’s in a blender and then pour into your cooking vessel). Heat to boiling and simmer 1 minute, or microwave for 1 minute. Now add the remaining soymilk. If your milk is cold, the lower temperature will bring down the temperature of the heated milk-- if you’re lucky, to the right temperature! If it doesn’t, cool it in the refrigerator to about 115 degrees F. Use an inexpensive candy thermometer to determine the temperature.

(IF YOU USE HOMEMADE SOYMILK , you need to add some type of sugar and a bit of salt to it, as most people do for drinking, because the starter needs some sugar to feed on. Dairy milk naturally contains sugars and sodium-- soy milk does not, so you have to add some. As soon as you strain the soymilk, add your sweetener and salt (I use 1 1/2 Tbs. organic sugar or maple syrup and 3/8 tsp. salt to each batch [6 cups] of soymilk),.)

Once the temperature is about 115 degrees F, whisk in the calcium water and the dried yogurt culture OR the room-temperature soy yogurt. Whisk well (or use a scalded hand immersion blender) to distribute the culture or soy yogurt throughout (if you do not mix it well, you may have a grainy yogurt). Pour the inoculated soymilk into your scalded jars or container, cover and incubate for 10-12 hours. (See above for 4 different ways to incubate .)

Soy yogurt tends to be mild, so it needs about 10 hours, (some people prefer 12) to develop the characteristic tartness that we are used to. (THIS VARIES, HOWEVER-- it can take 6 hours to get tart.) Taste it after 6 hours or so to see if it needs more time (it will be a little more tart when cooled). It’s okay to stir it.

THE YOGURT MAY LOOK RUNNY, AND MAY EVEN HAVE SEPARATED WHEN FINISHED. DON’T WORRY! WHISK THE YOGURT UNTIL CREAMY BEFORE PLACING IN THE REFRIGERATOR-- IT WILL SET UP JUST FINE AND BE NICE AND CREAMY AFTER THOROUGH CHILLING. You can use a tiny little whisk in the small jars, or you a large whisk in a large jar. OR, you can pour all the yogurt into a bowl, blend with a hand immersion blender (or in a blender jar), then pour it into a storage container (or containers) to chill and set.

Refrigerate immediately for about 12 hours before eating-- this is part of the incubation process and helps develop flavor. The yogurt will keep for about a week.

To start the next batch , keep back 1/4 cup of it. Let it come to room temperature before using as a starter. You can do this about 12-14 times before needing a fresh starter (maybe “borrow” 1/4 cup of commercial soy yogurt from a friend who buys it, or buy a small container of commercial soy yogurt).

TO MAKE SOY YOGURT CHEESE,
simply pour the yogurt into two layers of fine muslin lining a colander, tie up the ends to form a bag, and suspend from the sink tap or on a long wooden spoon resting across a tall pot to catch the liquid that drips from it. (You can also use a jelly-bag set-up or a special yogurt-cheese maker that you can buy in some outlets that sell yogurt making machines.) when the mixture has stopped dripping and is spreadable, season to taste with salt (and herbs, garlic, whatever you like), spoon into a container and refrigerate.

IF YOU WANT REALLY FIRM “CHEESE”, almost like a ricotta cheese, use calcim-fortified soymilk AND the calcium water like I told you NOT to do! The yogurt will come out quite rubbery. Break it up well and suspend it in a cheesecloth bag (or a special cone-shaped yogurt cheese maker). If you don’t want the “cheese” to be really sour, don’t incubate it as long as you would for normal yogurt. This has a great texture. Add some salt to it when it drained to your satisfaction.

TO MAKE FRUIT-FLAVORED FROZEN SOY YOGURT,
in a blender mix 2 1/2 cups soy yogurt made with 3/4 cup organic sugar, 1/2 tsp. vanilla, lemon, almond or orange extract. Optional is 2 Tbs. vodka or appropriately-fruit-flavored liqueur (alcohol keeps frozen desserts from freezing rock-solid). Blend well. Add 1 1/2 cups berries or chopped fruit (fresh or frozen). Blend until mixed. Freeze according to directions for your ice cream-making machine.

Nutrition Facts for plain yogurt
Serving size: 1 serving (1/2 cup)
Percent daily values based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Nutrition information calculated from recipe ingredients.

Amount Per Serving
Calories 70.84
Calories From Fat (29%) 20.77
% Daily Value
Total Fat 2.43g 4%
Saturated Fat 0.34g 2%
Cholesterol 0.31mg 0%
Sodium 73.24mg 3%
Potassium 164.02mg 5%
Carbohydrates 6.40g 2%
Dietary Fiber 1.59g 6%
Sugar 0.61g
Sugar Alcohols 0.00g
Net Carbohydrates 5.17g
Protein 6.75g 14%

DOES THIS HELP AT ALL??

if you have a yogurt maker - check the insturction manual - some yogurt makers cannot be used for making soy yogurt!

KW

Yes! Thanks for all the information. Now I’ll try it.