Top 15 Amazing Camping Cooking Tips

Here are some useful tips for more fun cooking time:

Tip Number 1: Write down a menu of all the dishes you intend to cook in the camping trip. It is better to opt for simple dishes that wouldn’t take your entire day preparing. From this menu, create a checklist of the ingredients, cookware and utensils you need to bring to ensure that you don’t forget anything.

Tip Number 2: Prepare ingredients at home. Measure them and put them in resealable plastic bags with labels so that you don’t spend all day cooking. Remember, there are still other activities to do.

Tip Number 3: Half-cook meat, poultry of fish at home. This will save cooking time as well as fuel for the stove. Place them in plastic containers and then freeze in the cooler. What’s also great about this is that pre-cooked meat last longer than raw meat.

Tip Number 4: Rely on dependable camping stoves. You don’t want your grand cooking endeavor be ruined by a stove that wouldn’t lit up. It is better to opt for trusted brands like Coleman for your camping stoves.

Tip Number 5: Don’t forget to bring a grate if you plan to grill. Don’t assume that the camp site will have all the amenities that you need.

Tip Number 6: Bring extra matches and keep them dry by putting in waterproof containers like film canisters. These canisters are also great as containers for salt and pepper.

Tip Number 7: Be flexible in your menu. Don’t wail or send your family to the next town to get you a green onion for your dish. Improvise or use an alternative ingredient that can be found within the perimeters of your campsite.

Tip Number 8: Bring small amounts of seasonings, condiments, and other food supplies to save packing space. Instead of bringing the huge bottle of ketchup, just bring sachets or transfer an amount enough for the whole family in a smaller container.

Tip Number 9: It is better to use block ice in your ice chest because it lasts much longer than cube or tube ice.

Tip Number 10: Rub the bottoms of pots and pans with dishwashing soap before cooking. This will make cleaning time afterwards easier.

Tip Number 11: Pocket knives come in handy during camp cooking. Use those that have locking features to avoid accidental folding of the blade when you cut up meat or slice a loaf of bread.
Tip Number 12: Never leave food outside your tent to prevent attracting bears or other animals.

Tip Number 13: Don’t forget to bring a heavy duty aluminum foil and a couple of ziplock bags. They don’t take up much space and have a wide variety of uses.

Tip Number 14: Cover pots and pans during cooking so the meals will get done faster and to save fuel. This will also keep unwanted insects out of your food.

Tip Number 15: Apply a little cooking oil on your camp grill so that food will not stick on it.

We know that you know your way around cooking but you’ll surely find these cooking tips helpful and amazing

Thanx Michael123 for some great memories.
For a family of 6: Take 1-7" & 1-10 or 12 " frypan w/ lids, 1 Dutch Oven for slow cooking OR put it on stove with water to heat up while you are eating … instant dishpan!, 1 handleless sauce or double boiler top that will nest in Dutch oven for space-saving and of course a coffee pot. I used to take my pressure cooker, too!. This kit plus heavy duty foil and non-stick vegetable spray and you can cook ANYTHING!

 If you don't have old mismatched pots 'n pans, shop the garage sales or thrift stores and

build yourself a camp supply box. Besure to clean and restock it as soon as you can after each trip. Then it is just grab and go have fun with your family time.
I used to freeze water in half-gallon screw top milk jugs for the cooler. We had 2 coolers
one with the drinks only. This kept people out of the “food” cooler and kept the food and frozen items very nicely.

 Have a great summer folks.  FSU Lady

I just want to comment on the tip about leaving food outside your tent. Do not store it inside the tent either or the critters will come in after it. You can keep small critters out of the food by storing it in bins with tight fitting lids. That won’t keep bears out, however. I have even heard of bears breaking windshields to get into cars to get food. If bears want the food, don’t try to stop them.

If cooking over a fire on a grate you can easily do any kind of meat. Potatoes - slice up and put in tin foil packages with butter, seasonings. Breakfast - take a large pot with you boil some water. Also take some zip-loc baggies. Cut up what you want in an omelet. Crack the eggs into the baggies and drop in the other ingredients - Cheese, tomatoes etc., drop baggie into the boiling water and boil for several minutes.


Wheat Grass Benefits, , Health Directory

Well Thanks for sharing the useful cooking tips… absolutely ill have to try it….…Thanks!!!

Run a wire clothes hanger thru the roll of paper towels. You’ll have a handy hanger & it’s easy to move around the campsite as needed.

Take toliet tissue w/you as there is never any in the toliets when needed. Hanger idea good too for the TP. You may feel sheepish while you carry it, but you’ll be prepared & the person that chuckled when you walked past - well guess what their problem w/be when they go!

Be sure your dog or cat has plenty of water & are secure after dark. Nevere leave them lose to run. Smaller animals fall prey to coyotes & attract other preditors. (When I lived in CA smaller animals were called “coyote food”.)

A small garden rake comes in handy to clear debris & clean-up the camp areas.

If you are a regular camper, an old military footlocker is great to set up as a kitchen. Handles make it easy for 2 people to carry, resists elements & additonal seating if needed.

For evening cocktail hours we stash our wine & liquor bottles inside 1/2 gallon juice & milk cartons. Just wide enough to toss in a few ice to keep cool & discrete enough the neighbors don’t notice. LOL.

Purell & baby wipes make quick help for clean hands for cooking or eating.

A large stock/soup pot handy to boil water when needed & the pot makes a better dishpan than plastic since plastic always seems to be greasy & hard to clean. A few drops of ammonia in the dishwater helps w/greasy dishes/pots cleanup.

Run a wire clothes hanger thru the roll of paper towels. You’ll have a handy hanger & it’s easy to move around the campsite as needed.

Take toliet tissue w/you as there is never any in the toliets when needed. Hanger idea good too for the TP. You may feel sheepish while you carry it, but you’ll be prepared & the person that chuckled when you walked past - well guess what their problem w/be.

Take extra baggies in various sizes & slip into a larged baggies. You’ll find you 'em for everything.

Be sure your dog or cat has plenty of water & are secure after dark. Never leave them lose to run. Smaller animals fall prey to coyotes & attract other preditors. (When I lived in CA smaller animals were called “coyote food”.)

A small garden rake comes in handy to clear debris & clean-up the camp areas.

If you are a regular camper, an old military footlocker is great to set up as a kitchen. Handles make it easy for 2 people to carry, resists elements & additonal seating if needed.

For evening cocktail hours we stash our wine & liquor bottles inside 1/2 gallon juice & milk cartons. Just wide enough to toss in a few ice cuke to keep cool & discrete enough the neighbors don’t notice. LOL.

Purell, hand/baby wipes make quick help for clean hands for cooking or eating.

A large stock/soup pot is handy to boil water when needed & the pot makes a better dishpan than plastic as plastic always seems to be greasy & hard to clean. A few drops of ammonia in the dishwater helps w/greasy dishes/pots cleanup.

We keep a cooler for frozen, a cooler for cold and a cooler for drinks, we hang paper towels with sash cord from any handy protuberance. I cook several one pot meals and then freeze them into a solid block, they thaw slowly and help keep the frozen cooler cold. We marinate beef and chicken before we freeze it, by the time it thaws it’s ready to cook, the marinade helps keep the bacteria down. We have a waffle iron that heats on a burner–wonderful treat with pie filling and whipped cream. Eat and clean up well before sundown and the critters are much less of a problem. Don’t cook in your sleeping space. BEARS. Don’t put garbage out at night, keep it in your cooler until you can dispose of it properly. Look at your fork before putting it in your mouth–eating bees is no fun.