10 Things You Didn’t Know about Barbecue

10 Things You Didn’t Know about Barbecue

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Every spring, North Americans gear up their grill, stock up on the meat and prepare for many mouth-watering barbecues. But how much do we really know about the art of barbecuing? From the familiar pastime’s origins to surprising tips and tactics, this list will provide you with all the information you need to wow your friends at the next neighborhood barbecue!

  1. Barbecues originated in pig-pickin’s, feasts that were common in the Southern United States prior to the Civil War. Whole pigs were cooked and eaten by the crowd.

  2. “Smoking” was used as far as 6000 years ago in order to make meats safe to eat and store. The meat was exposed to smoke and low heat in order to prevent bacteria and enzymes from growing.

  3. In Australia, a barbecue is commonly referred to as a barbie. The famous statement “I’ll slip an extra shrimp on the barbie for you,” which appeared in Australian tourism advertisements, is often used to refer to the country.

  4. What most North Americans partake in today isn’t actually barbecuing. Barbecuing is cooking at temperatures around the boiling point of water (180-220F) for a longer time period, in order to make the meat tender while preserving its natural juices. Today, the method most commonly used is in fact broiling: cooking at 475-700F in much less time.

  5. According to the Barbecue Industry Association, half of all marshmallows eaten in the U.S. have been toasted over a grill.

  6. For an easy way to check how much propane you have left, bring your bathroom scale outside and weigh the gas tank.

  7. The origin of the word barbecue is unclear. Some believe it came from the American-Indian word barbacoa which is derived from barabicu found in the language of the Arawak people of the Caribbean for a wood on which foods were cooked. Others say it came from the french words “de barbe à queue,” meaning “whiskers to tail.”

  8. To add a smoky flavor to your gas-grill-cooked foods or foods cooked inside the house, use “liquid smoke.” A condensation of actual smoke, this product can be easily added to your barbecue marinade or sauce.

  9. Brisket, the extremely hard cut of meat taken from a cow’s chest, takes one to two hours per pound to barbecue. That’s an average 12 hours on the grill for a basic 8-pound piece!

  10. Kansas City, Missouri and Lexington, North Carolina both claim to be the barbecue capitals of the world. Memphis, meanwhile, stakes a claim to being the pork barbecue capital.

Now you’re set to impress!

Until Next Time… Be Well!

Kind Regards,

RSN
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Techniques for making the best BBQ

The first of these techniques – and the most popular method for those who grill in their back yards – is the style where the food is cooked directly over the source of heat. This way, the food is rapidly cooked on a hot grill suspended directly over the charcoals, the wood, or the gas burners. Rarely is the lid ever closed. Any foods, including the most tender cuts, hamburgers, steaks, kabobs of all kinds, chicken, and even vegetables are quickly seared and cooked to perfection using this technique. If sauces are desired, they can be added before hand, during the cooking process, or even after the food comes off the grill. These choices will all create different and enjoyable tastes and flavors.

The second barbeque cooking technique uses heat indirectly. This is more appropriate when you’re cooking much larger or whole cuts of meat, such as especially thick steaks, roasts, a whole hog, or a pork shoulder. When you’re cooking using this method, the food is cooked away from the actual source of heat. This usually requires a water pan of some kind in order to maintain the moisture level of the food. The temperatures generally sit in around 250ºF. During this cooking method, the lid of the barbeque remains closed most of the time, and the length of the cooking is much longer than in the first method. When you’re using an indirect barbeque cooker, there is usually an additional fire box that allows you to combine charcoal and wooden logs for burning. This allows the heat and the smoke to rise through the cooking chamber where the meat is, so that it is heated perfectly. The rule of thumb of this technique is a low temperature for a long time.

No matter which method you use, it’s important not to cook your meat too quickly. If the internal temperature of your meat rises too quickly as you cook it, the water and the fat within it will be expelled before the collagen is able to melt. This means that your cut will be dry and tough. However, you cannot cook too slowly or you will risk a bacterial contamination. Though there is a fine line for barbequing properly, it’s important to find that line and stick to it.

If you’re already dealing with a cut of meat that is tough, such as a brisket or a pork roast, consider cooking slowly as the collagen adds flavor to the meat. If you buy a less tough, more expensive cut, you can cook at a higher temperature for a shorter period of time. This is why ribs and steaks take such a short time to cook, while pork shoulders or beef brisket can run up to 20 hours.

As a final note, it’s important to have fun while you barbeque! Your pleasure will come through in your cooking as it will leave you motivated, and willing to try new and interesting things.

Enjoy!

RSN

Your average backyard cook is no expert in the barbeque or grilling field. He has no television shows on the Food Network. He has no grilling cookbooks out. Nor has any of those been part of his lifetime goal.

No, your average outdoor cooking enthusiast makes more mistakes with bbq grilling than you could ever imagine. The meat ends up dry and tough time after time, despite marinating for hours. Or the meat is burnt or cooked too long.

These mistakes are made time and time again because your average backyard cook usually does not know any different. He does not automatically know How to Barbeque.

Here are some of the more common mistakes and do’s and don’ts made in bbq grill cooking:

1) If you started with frozen meat, make sure the meat is thawed completely. Trying to cook the inside of a still-frozen piece of meat is next to impossible without burning the outside.

2) When using a charcoal grill, try to start the fire without charcoal lighter fluid. Lighter fluid taste will always get into your meat no matter how much you cook the coals down first. A chimney starter makes starting the fire a breeze. It also allows you to add charcoal along the way should the coals burn out along the way.

3) Never poke the bbq meat with a fork after cooking has begun. This is one of the most common mistakes and one of the most deadly for your barbeque. When poking with a fork, the juices will run out of the meat and right into the bottom of the barbeque pit or grill. Your meat will be dry and less tender. Use a long set of tongs to turn the meat.

4) Lower the heat. Except for grilled steaks, which need a quick searing, cook slowly over low to medium heat. Lower heat is much more manageable and it will make the meat tender and juicy.

5) Quit lifting the lid to check the meat. Every time you do that it changes the temperature inside the bbq grill or pit. Air from you opening the lid acts like a sponge and dries the meat up. Opening the lid also increases your chances of flare-ups.

6) This is more of a food safety mistake. Do not put the cooked meat back on the same plate or platter that the raw meat was on without washing it first. Mixing the cooked with the raw just begs for someone to get sick.

7) After removing the meat from the bbq grill or pit, let it rest for at about 5-10 minutes. Cutting into or slicing the meat immediately after pulling it from the cooker will cause all the juices to flow out of the meat and onto the platter.

Of course, these are not all of the mistakes made by the amateur outdoor cook, but are some of the more common. But if you will prevent doing these yourself, you will eliminate many of the things that cause barbeque failures.

Your guests and family will wonder how come your grilled or barbequed food is so much better then it used to be. And, who knows?..Maybe the Food Network will come looking for you.

Enjoy!

RSN

Barbecue Pits Recipes

So you’re thinking of having a barbecue session with your family and friends this coming weekend. With that plan, you probably are looking for some barbecue pits recipes that you can prepare for that coming event. The question is where you can find the barbecue pits recipes that will meet your meticulous taste? Well, there’s no need to worry about that.

Well, before you go and invest time on researching recipes anywhere online, I would like you to know that you’ve got one of the right pages. Yes, I have actually below some of the delicious barbecue pits recipes you can consider for that barbecue session of yours.

So here are the barbecue pits recipes you’ll love to prepare:

Tejas Blue Ribbon Brisket

Heard the name Tejas? Or, are you familiar with Tejas Meat Rub? Well, you’ll need that item here.

  1. To begin, season an untrimmed brisket with the Tejas Meat Rub liberally after spraying it with butter flavored PAM. You can also use a mustard or Worcestershire sauce in place of the PAM.
  2. Then, wrap the brisket in foil and leave it in the fridge overnight. Allow it to reach a room temperature while filling water reservoir in your barbecue smoker. Bring the temperature up to 200 degrees Fahrenheit.
  3. Once cooked, remove the foil and place the brisket with the fat side down on far end of the smoker. Just make sure that you placed it away from the firebox. Wait for four hours and remove the brisket and warp it again tightly with the foil.
  4. End the barbecuing with the brisket foiled. Make sure to cook it until the strands of meat can be twisted on the flat easily with fork.

Grilled Chicken

So how about preparing a barbecue chicken? Well, you can prepare it grilled. How?

  1. Just halve the chicken and sprinkle with freshly squeezed lemon juice.
  2. Then, season it with salt, black pepper, paprika and garlic. Prepare the grill by raising the fire grate in the firebox to the grilling position. You can use a mesquite charcoal as a fuel source.
  3. Watch out for the whitening of the coals. Once the coals are white, put the chicken on the firebox grill for five to seven minutes, per side. Avoid over cooking.

So that’s it! There are a lot other barbecue pits recipes out there that you can prepare for your barbecue time. If you want to find more barbecue pits recipes, then go and do the challenge online.

Enjoy!

RSN